My oh Myanmar



I know that symmetry has often been the way
of keeping score against the junta in Mandalay,
But now that Zuck is pitching up
Opppression alley-oops
How long could it be
Before we see
After blinking a people no longer in need
No longer alive
and they cry from their graves
We fought til the end
We fought and were brave
And Sim Chi Htet was a lad with a gift
He could mimic the songbirds of the Myth
And his song was so pleasant, they said,
It was a song without an end
The striving of Mindat, a punch to the Chin
A karen mistreated it is without end

If Yangon can hold for until someone who humane will come
and see between the fire and trees
The masked the undaunted undefeated Burmese
A people unconquered who march in the streets
Appear in a flash like a ghost to a beat
Disappear with the wind and hit with a flash
Min Aung Hlaing’s got horns up his ass


The forces of many will coalesce
five fingers are less than the sum of their parts
or the fist.
The chin will hit the Han right back
no thank you lao’ba’shi
I’m scarred tigger, I’m scared pooh
Whose right do we take?
We take all you fool!

The forces of many will coalesce
five fingers are less than the sum of their parts
or the fist.
The chin will hit the Han right back
no thank you lao’ba’shi
I’m scarred tigger, I’m scared pooh
Whose right do we take?
We take all you fool! We take the state and claim false votes
With no vote for the tank we got in and we rode
behind such a dancer, a dancing queen
Whose banger moves were stuck between
the coup de’tat as the tatmanda
overtook my oh Myanmar
do not give in to the dark

#2 – When the Only Move is the Only Move

Of Brandon’s games to get any attention, they did so when positions and games were shown by the extremely popular agadmator, whose twitter shared the following game when Brandon first played it. To date, Antonio Radic’ has shared 3 games, 1 of which has been shown on this list, and the following; for most of the middle game and into an obvious winning position for white, Brandon was able to tie down white’s pieces just enough, force the opponent to continnue playing best moves – when he himself is being a gambler – though making progress for white looks easy. The pieces for black, despite their being fewer of them, they exert far more pressure; the king’s position has been shattered, but the immediately play of white requires some piece activation. Black’s pieces are majestic, and the only piece in white’s camp looking into black’s is a bishop staring at its own pawn.

splitting pawns for long term pressure and open lines.

Though Brandon will lose a piece, quality, time, and complications will compensate for the material loss; in addition, white’s pawn structure inhibits the pieces and limits their mobility, giving them little room for improvement or attack. Meanwhile, the white king is weakened by g4, despite the fork, which will prove to be a bridge too far for white – one unable to be held.


A clearance sacrifice, or positional piece sacrifice, is giving up a piece to otherwise expose an enemy king, kill their piece or pawn coordination, or for long term strategic advantages that will present a number of problems for the opponent. Mikhal Tal said, “You must take your opponent into a deep, dark forest where 2+2 = 5 and the way out is big enough only for one.”

Remember kids, pawns do not go backwards, and you open the defenses in front of your king at your own peril.


Fair enough; Brandon exchanges the only pieces on board capable of “getting over” the wedges uncomfortably planted within white’s positions, a structure that severely blocks in and makes passive white’s entire forces.

A look at piece activity and reach; though black’s pieces will be fewer in number, the opponent’s pieces will be inferior in quality. Whereas all of black’s pieces are extremely limited, with a knight in the center the best piece of white’s, and about to fit will be a move before the game ends before white would finally get his last piece into the game. From here, the following sequence led us here. White’s bishop hits two squares, the light squared bishop can’t go forward, and the queen and queen’s rook are similarly struggling to influence the game.

Queen takes knight — in order to preserve the exchange, though taking the light squared bishop might have been a better attempt – white is still given a completely winning position, yet the time to untangle is not there:


Queen takes knight; now boxed in and capable of going only backward. White can take three pieces in this position, and doesn’t actually blunder – though again, it was not too late to take the light squared bishop, a weak complex that will hurt white later.

Taking with the bishop could have done a lot to solve white’s temporary problems, but the light squared bishop will now breathe fire; the key move within all of this and first brilliancy over his career, this game would feature two; one, human awarded; the second, as evaluated by chess.com.


What good is a phone, if you are unable to speak? The best move is to take the knight, and white is still “comfortably” a piece up.



So, Bc4, saving the piece and cutting off the king’s breathing room, limiting his space to literally one square; white takes instead of pushing – gxh5, black executes the plan from the moment of the fork after – gxh5, and white activates his bishop with Bxh5 – snatching a pointless pawn and – and voila, the white king is extremely exposed, and it will take white several moves to organize his pieces in such a manner as to put any pressure on the black position. From this point forward, Brandon would play only moves; move after move he chose the engine’s #1 recommendation, forcing white to play as precise as a Fish; And it begins with the most important, first award in his career:

How is it possible to put pressure on the position – one move will not make black better; but only one continues the fight.

White is a move away from being mated, and the black rooks are coming – pay attention to the white rooks and how inhibited they are by white’s static structure; computers are famously terrible in closed positions.

White compounds his earlier crime of g4 by pushing more pawns in front of his king, though it was unclear what else to do.

Though the engine gives white the advantage, we must remember these are estimations of which neither play is possibly aware. A position can be totally winning despite being fucking nightmarishly difficult to play. Though Brandon concedes the luck, when the one chances comes, the pagan finds it and finds it immediately. The final position might have been different in the hands of a master, but the gambler who split his pawns to open up and mobilize rooks, he was betting that in a short, short while, his pieces would threaten so much that white would break. When white flinched, that’s all it took. This game is a warm-up to the game that made Brandon a player whose games were shown, though he had as many disasters for the first years – that is, when he began playing in 2017 when he fail ill on account of him being out of drugs.

There’s a rule in his house; always sacrifice the exchange. And black plays the winning move, RxBg4!!

Now, black is slightly better, but of course you can’t take the rook be–

Okay, man, okay. Black to play and mate in 3.

Take my wife, please!

Now, the next game is played by two players who are much more mature, and by a gambler who has learned not to always bet the house on every round. So this game was a grind from the start.

2020 – PavelJezovic – IM – rtg. 2590
vs
sisyphusunemployed 2190 ? (provisional) – Brandon plays the Sicilian against a prodigy, known for sacrifice and tactically sharp games.

https://lichess.org/0QA8a6rZS5Uk

Continue reading #2 – When the Only Move is the Only Move

Honorable Mention: Closing in on a Top 3

As this game was being played, Brandon’ brother and formidable player in his own right thought he had really lost his mind. In his other games, when he didn’t understand what his brother was going for, but he could see some hint, some glimpse of a purpose behind throwing a knight away or being such a gambler — but the moves throughout the early and middle games from this short, frenzied fight seemed just ridiculous to the young player, who was then rated around 1980 himself.

After Bc4, it is certain that every onlooker thought the man a drunkard. 



Please pause the video and find the “winning” move. 


 

As this game was being played, Brandon’ brother and formidable player in his own right thought he had really lost his mind. In his other games, when he didn’t understand what his brother was going for, but he could see some hint, some glimpse of a purpose behind throwing a knight away or being such a gambler — but the moves throughout the early and middle games from this short, frenzied fight seemed just ridiculous to the young player, who was then rated around 1980 himself.

After Bc4, it is certain that every onlooker thought the man a drunkard.


Please pause the video and find the “winning” move

 

First we note his king in the center, his pieces without future homes, many blocked by his own… so let’s tear open this king and keep it in the center, take it for a walk. 

We’ll be here again soon…




Pause once again …






Round 2: 5.5 – Moses Outside Canaan – A glimpse of the Promised Land.


After the first game between Brandon and a titled player, as we saw recently, he made a speculative queen sacrifice in the early middle game, which was not the best of moves. Though he got an initiative from the sacrifice, a queen for a knight and bishop, he would later miss a number of chances after equalizing by move 28. In the end, he missed a final tactic, another sacrifice, one he looked at but talked himself out of playing.

The next game in which he would face a titled player saw him in a familiar position, a position he will find himself in twice before seeing his goal of beating a titled player would be realized. This video will be the endpoint of that, but in the interim, two games against titled players – an IM and CM respectively, which are available here:

Game 2 saw Brandon playing a CM, with the black pieces, and he had chances to get a winning position – and again, he talked himself out of the move. It would be an opportunity he would pass on, and a move he would regret.

The following position was before him, and Brandon considered the obvious move —






In the following position, the only move that gives black advantage is Rxc3. The pawn can’t take because of the pin, and the rooks are going to double; white has problems Brandon planed this move, after the previous move, the bishop check, but he thought he could win the opponent’s queen — and so he blundered.






Yes, he would win the queen, but he would fight out the rest of the game in an equal position with a queen against two rooks and, in the end, the players agreed to a draw. Though he had chances to get an advantage, he blew it; by choosing not to do what he was so known for as an up-and-coming player.


The rest of the game can be seen by following it here: https://lichess.org/L8JhIRCg/black


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